Places

LAGUNA HONDA ACCESS POINT

Official entry point. Information and ticket sales here.


LOS TORREONES

Former entrance to the Park that since the second half of the twentieth century, has been the scene of family photographs for tens of generations of inhabitants of the Strait of Magellan. Watch out for pedestrians!


MUSEO DEL ESTRECHO

Located in the highest part of the Park, the Museum houses a modern multimedia exhibition that through art and science explains the processes of formation of the territory, the life forms that inhabit it and the history of human presence in this place of the world. It has a large terrace where you can see the immensity of the Strait and see Puerto del Hambre (MHN). Cafeteria and souvenir shop of the Park only available in the Museum. In the Museum of the Strait you will also find a gallery in which exhibitions of content related to life in the Strait are frequently made


FORT BULNES SITE

Rebuilt between 1941 and 1943, Fort Bulnes has for years been a "must-see" for the inhabitants of the Strait of Magellan. Originally founded in 1843, it was the first Chilean settlement in the territory and gave rise to the foundation of the city of Punta Arenas 5 years later.


Wind Forest Trail

This trail begins at the O’Higgins Lighthouse (located behind Fort Bulnes) and crosses a Coihues de Magallanes forest that grows perpendicularly due to the prevailing wind force. The trail leads to the Mirador del Estrecho, from where you can see the passage of boats, birds, dolphins and whales


Coastal Trail

This trail runs through the forests and rocks around the Fort through three strategically located viewpoints that allow unparalleled views of the surrounding landscape. This trail runs through the forests and rocks around the Fort through three strategically located viewpoints that allow unparalleled views of the surrounding landscape.


Port Famine

The King Don Felipe City (Puerto del Hambre) was founded in 1584 by Pedro Sarmiento de Gamboa on behalf of the Spanish crown in order to take possession and colonize the Strait of Magellan. Three years later, the tragic outcome of the city was recounted by one of the few survivors. To promote recovery, avoid deterioration and allow research work without interference, this place is closed to the public.